Ladybugs Possess A Secret Ability That Was Not Even Known To Experts | Masters Touch Pest Solutions | Pest & Termite Control

Ladybugs Possess A Secret Ability That Was Not Even Known To Experts

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Ladybugs Possess A Secret Ability That Was Not Even Known To Experts

Ladybugs Possess A Secret Ability That Was Not Even Known To Experts

As far as ladybugs go, everyone seems content with their existence. They are not ugly creatures, like many insects are; in fact, many people find the ladybug to be the most majestic looking of all insects. However, beyond a ladybug’s black polka-dotted shell, what do you know about them? Probably not a whole lot, but it turns out that ladybugs are actually capable of reaching impressively high altitudes.

Typically speaking, ladybugs are not known for their impressive flying abilities. A ladybug’s wings are pretty small, and it is difficult to imagine ladybugs flying any faster than a few miles per hour, and no higher than a hundred feet or so. However, size is not everything in the insect world. In reality, ladybugs can travel at altitudes reaching anywhere between five hundred and sixteen hundred feet.

Recently researchers clarified their understanding of ladybug flight by obtaining data from a large-scale study. Although most ladybugs remain within an altitude of five hundred to sixteen hundred feet from the ground, there are a few ladybugs that can reach the astonishing height of thirty six hundred feet, and this is all while they are traveling at thirty seven miles per hour. The average ladybug travels at a speed of around twenty miles per hour.

It did not take long for the researchers to notice that the ladybugs that were reaching the highest altitudes were also the ladybugs that were traveling the fastest. This trend led researchers to think that the ladybugs at higher altitudes were traveling faster because of the greater wind speeds pushing them along. The findings of this study are causing many experts to rethink which flying animals are really the fastest while substituting wind as a factor.

Have you ever seen a ladybug fly into the sky and beyond your sight?

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